This Week at Fifty & Five 10.1.13

Facebook Expands Graph Search Facebook announced Monday that it is expanding the scope of its Graph Search tool to include posts and comments. With the new addition, users can search for not only “friends who like Fifty & Five,” for example, but also for specific posts about Fifty & Five, photo captions, check-ins, and comments. […]

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Facebook Expands Graph Search

Facebook announced Monday that it is expanding the scope of its Graph Search tool to include posts and comments. With the new addition, users can search for not only “friends who like Fifty & Five,” for example, but also for specific posts about Fifty & Five, photo captions, check-ins, and comments. The feature is being released slowly, and although it is currently only available for a select group of Graph users, everyone else will gain the capability soon.

At Graph Search’s release nearly 10 months ago, the search engine seemed to have more potential than actual benefits, but we think that this new addition will make it more useful. As Facebook moves further into the social TV space by giving networks access to data on what users are talking about and when they’re talking about it, contextual information for posts about a show will yield greater insights. Users can also see what people are saying to their friends about a given subject, which is another indicator of what is important to them. The update can be used as a resource for your business as well — it will be easier than ever to find out what your potential customers engage with most or to search through their comments and posts.

 

YouTube Updates Comment Layout

The comments under YouTube videos are not exactly renowned as a location for rigorous intellectual debate, and chances are they never will be. But the Google-owned video service is now taking steps to bring more important and useful comments to the fore – and to let the channel owner automatically delete comments with certain words. YouTube already offers a “top comments” section for the most upvoted comments, but they can still often be irrelevant to the video in question. Starting this week on channel pages, and rolling out slowly to video pages by the end of the year, reverse chronological comments will fall away entirely.

You’ll start to see a new set of comments rise to the top: those by the video’s creator, “popular personalities” (i.e., YouTube celebrities), “engaged discussions” with a long thread, and people you know and interact with – both on YouTube and Google+ – so no two users’ YouTube comments section will look quite the same.

 

What’s Trending

Twitter May Make Its IPO Filing Public This Week

Two weeks ago, we reported that Twitter had filed for an initial public offering. Now that IPO filing is ready and the company intends to make it public this week, according to Quartz. The goal is for Twitter to begin trading, likely on the New York Stock Exchange, before Thanksgiving, according to the source – although the filing could still be delayed by a variety of factors, from changes to the prospectus to market conditions.

Pinterest Update Expands Article Pins

Pinterest is expanding its set of “rich pins” to include more details about pinned articles. Now, when users pin a story or article to a board, the pin will also contain other relevant information such as the author’s name, the article title, a brief description and a larger link. Previously, articles pinned on Pinterest only contained photos from the article with a link at the bottom. (Users who wanted to include the article title or description had to add it manually).

Twitter Unveils Emergency Alert System

Twitter on Wednesday announced Twitter Alerts, a new system that enables public institutions and NGOs to send out emergency alerts via text message and push notifications in times of crisis. Users can sign up to receive emergency notifications from specific accounts, and will receive a text or push notification when that account sends a tweet it labels as an alert. In addition to the texts and notifications, ‘alert’ tweets will appear alongside an orange bell icon in the Twitter stream.

Author
Lucas Vandenberg
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